Tag Archives: public relations

Media Relations and Marketing Experts

FischTank Marketing and PR Celebrates One-Year Anniversary

FischTank Marketing and PR -- NYC Media and Marketing ExpertsGood afternoon! A quick note before we share the release below. The first year at FischTank has been exciting, challenging, eye-opening, and most importantly — a learning experience.

However, none of this would be possible without the support from our wonderful clients, who deserve the results we achieve on their behalf in exchange for the trust they place in us. We are also very appreciative for our partners and friends, including accountants, lawyers, vendors, and others within our network. We are thrilled to consider you members of our professional family.

It’s been one year of success, but that is exactly as stated — ONE year. There is a long way to go before we actually celebrate anything, and as you probably know, there are no guarantees in any walk of life. You make your own breaks, and in an effort to keep things breaking our way, we look forward to continuing to work our tail off on behalf of our clients.

Thank you again,

Eric Fischgrund

Link to Release

FischTank Marketing and PR Celebrates One-Year Anniversary

NYC-Headquartered Company Continues Growth; Adds Team Members and New Practice Areas

FischTank Marketing and PR, a full-service communications and marketing firm helping clients across multiple industries amplify their message and elevate their brand, today announced its one-year anniversary since it’s inception.

FischTank, founded and led by Eric Fischgrund, provides strategic marketing and communications solutions including but not limited to public relations, digital marketing, SEO/ORM/SEM, advertising, and content marketing such as whitepapers, blogging, and press release writing. The boutique firm caters to clients spanning multiple industries and verticals such as clean technology, emerging technologies, real estate, non-profits, professional services, and business technologies such as adtech, social platforms, and other marketing solutions.

Recently, FischTank named Matthew Bretzius, a former journalist turned PR and marketing professional, as Vice President. Bretzius brings in-house and agency-side experience to the firm, with a strong reputation of leading startups to Inc. 500|5000 companies in amplifying their brand messaging to resonate with customers/clients, shareholders, and relevant media outlets.

“We are so appreciative of our clients, partners, and team members who made this first year of growth so successful,” said Eric Fischgrund, founder of FischTank. “Matt’s addition to our team has bolstered client services and enabled us to expand at a scalable rate. We are most thankful for the exciting clients we get to work with on an everyday basis, and look forward to continuing our results-oriented approach of providing them sound marketing and communications solutions.”

“I was thrilled to join FischTank due in large part to the terrific roster of clients and partners that Eric was already working with,” said Matthew Bretzius, Vice President at FischTank. “I’m very excited to see what 2015 brings not just for FischTank, but for our clients, as we continue to grow and work together over the next year to achieve results we can be proud of.”

About FischTank Marketing and PR

FischTank Marketing and PR is a full-service communications and marketing firm serving clients spanning various industries, including but not limited to clean technology, emerging technology, real estate, marketing/ad tech, and non-profits. Incorporating an integrated strategy consisting of media relations, SEM/SEO, digital/social media, copywriting, and outbound marketing, FischTank helps clients amplify their message with results that impact their bottom line. For more information, visit http://www.FischTankPR.com or follow us Twitter:http://www.twitter.com/Fisch_Tank or Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/TheFischTank

 

 

4 Tips to Hone Your Content Marketing Strategy

As any marketing professional or firm will tell you, it is no longer difficult or necessary to SELL clients and agencies on content marketing strategies highlighted by targeted blog posts, short videos and whitepapers busting with statistics. The benefits are endless and well-established — drive traffic to your website, solicit contact information for lead generation, establish yourself as a credible source and many more. What you SHOULD be telling your clients, is how to make the most of your content — ensuring delivery, download, engagement and return on investment.

Producing the content is only half the battle — let’s talk about winning the war and making sure your content marketing strategy achieves your desired goals:

1. Define your audience. Does your content have a specific end-user? The answer should always be, yes. If you are creating a whitepaper or blog post with the intent to receive downloads (and contact information) from a niche target audience, make sure your content addresses their pain points. For example, a financial advisor may want to solicit information and web visits from individuals between the ages of 40 and 50 who are getting ready to send their children to college. Rather than title your content, “10 Ways to Save Money,” try “The College Decision: 10 Finance Tips You Need to Know,” or something to that effect. Yes, you may get less downloads and web visits. However, the qualified leads and traffic you do receive will be much more credible and likely yield higher ROI.

2. Promote effectively. Too many times, I see an ad on LinkedIn or Facebook that says something to the effect of “Click here to reduce costs by 20 percent.” OF COURSE I want to reduce costs by 20 percent, who doesn’t? However, I may want to know just what it is we’re talking about! If I’m a marketer, and the cost-savings tip pertains to e-commerce, I’m bored already and will probably not consider you a credible source for content. Also, you were just charged $7.00 for my click. The same goes for e-mail blasts, the first thing most folks do with a nebulous e-mail blast is delete or unsubscribe. Similar to tip number one, try making it abundantly clear what the audience will receive if they pursue the content. If one were targeting a small business owner, then something like this may resonate — “automate your invoicing for only $9.99 a month” — as with this example, there is no gray area.

3. Ensure your landing page is efficient. How many times have you clicked an advertisement or link within an e-mail, only to find yourself directed to seven different sites, and required to fill out more information than during a doctor’s visit? It happens all the time. Landing pages suffer from poor graphics, text that doesn’t match the content you’re pursuing, slow webpage load times, broken links and other content marketing atrocities. It’s important to test your conversion process from start to finish, from the first click to the actual download/visit itself, to make sure there are no issues potentially damaging your credibility as a content source. Also, consider that most people don’t want to provide too much information, so when soliciting info, stick to the basics: name, company affiliate (if B2B), location and have phone number and reason for visiting marked as optional.

4. Make sure your sales team is locked in. You are almost there! You created informative content, promoted it efficiently, and solicited plenty of sales leads. Now what? Don’t let the conversion process stop there! Before structuring any content marketing campaign, ensure that you have a plan for what to do with those leads. The next step should require a phone call, introductory e-mail, physical mail or meeting or any other “touch point.” In most cases, it is highly recommended to reply within 24 hours, at the latest, to ensure the lead doesn’t go cold, and you receive the credit for your effective content marketing strategy!

Breaking the 9-5 mindset

As posted on LinkedIn blog…Man-Upset-Work2

Just over two months ago I left a major NYC-based PR agency to form my own marketing/PR practice. It’s been both terrifying and exhilarating, but more importantly, a learning experience. Literally every day I mess something up, do something right, and learn more about myself overall.

One of the first things I’ve learned, is that I might not have been wiredto work 9-5s. Now, saying that 9-5s don’t make sense is easier saidthan done. After all, I’ve been abiding by that structure for close to a decade. My first few days of not being required to be somewhere at 8:30am, and responding to e-mails and calls on my own time left me wracked with guilt. “Shouldn’t I be doing something or meeting with someone at 11am?” I thought.

The answer was no, but it took me a solid month to figure that out. Of course, I’m available around the clock to my clients and partners, but realizing my hours of efficiency and maximizing them has proven to be productive, and very beneficial to me mentally. For example, I’m an early riser, and usually start working between 6:30 – 7am. This provides me: a) a quiet time to focus and map the day; b) time to get e-mails to recipients before their inbox is full; and c) enough time to get ahead so I can use the rest of the day to react to urgent matters.

I’m very productive up until lunch, but then, like many — run into that afternoon wall that looks like it requires caffeine or a nap. This is generally where I’ve found it beneficial to take a walk, run some errands, catch up on news, and other mental breaks from my laptop and cell phone. Normally, when I return from this period, I’m refreshed and able to dive back into work. Following dinner and some relaxation time, I will generally work for anywhere from 1-3 hours. During weekends, I work as needed.

What’s the point, and why does my schedule matter to you? It doesn’t, at all. What should matter is identifying when YOU are most productive and how YOU can best leverage your skill-set to do a good job for yourself, clients and colleagues. Everybody on this planet is wired differently, just because 9-5s are the “standard” for work — doesn’t mean it needs to apply to you.

I don’t know if running my own practice will be a permanent professional/lifestyle decision for me, or whether I’ll return to the world of W2s tomorrow or in 20 years. What I do know, is that this mental break from a 9-5 mindset has taught me plenty about myself, and I’m only two months in. Whatever comes next, I’ll be better equipped on a daily basis to maximize my own potential, and get the job done.

First blog post on a Sunday afternoon

FischTank Marketing and PR finally launches

Nothin but a fresh start!

Where to begin?

I’ve always had A LOT to say, enough that it has frequently gotten me into trouble with family, friends, and teachers…hopefully in a way they each appreciate.

I’ve found a way to parlay that enthusiasm for communications into a career in marketing, public relations, writing and digital/social media. I guess I should consider myself fortunate — my most annoying quality has built my career. Life is funny.

I’ve enjoyed the marketing/PR positions and clients I’ve held and worked with for the majority of my career, but what I’ve really enjoyed is learning and making a difference. I love when a campaign results in a return on investment for the companies I work with, whether it’s to support a major launch, generating sales, or establishing someone as a dominant player in their industry.

Because of this, I believe I’ve received a free education — I’ve worked with a variety of brilliant entrepreneurs, clean technology companies making our planet greener, wacky consumer products enjoyed by millions, innovative technologies that change industries, real estate professionals building the next big thing, and financial services firms managing billions of dollars.

It’s been a blast, and for that reason, I decided to leave my full-time position working at a top PR firm in New York City, to start my own marketing consultant practice.

With any luck, I’ll continue to grow as a professional while doing great things for the companies I work with.

Here we go!